Spinach

I think we are now safely past the spinach stage in our CSA season. So, now seems like the perfect time to talk about spinach, since I am not spending all my time cooking and freezing it.

First, a little background: we are on the CSA roster for Britt Farms, and we get a box of produce each week. We never know what we’re going to get until the day of the pick-up, but there’s always some fruit and lots of vegetables. Despite being a family of five, we still just get the small box, because our kids still largely subsist on macaroni and chicken, with vegetables added in as flavoring or discussion pieces. My husband and I make it our goal to eat all of the food before it spoils, and this year we are probably doing our best yet. I think I’ve had to throw out half a head each of cabbage and lettuce, plus a beet or two. We also haven’t had to given anything away yet. It helps that we’ve been doing this for about four years, so we now know many ways to cook most of the vegetables we get, and I also know how to save some of them for later use.

Which brings us back to spinach. Everyone in our family actually seems to like spinach just fine, but we just don’t eat it in quantities. It’s a pain to wash, it goes bad quickly, and I never used it fast enough.

Now, however, I use the “wash, steam, and freeze” method of spinach preparation. I wash the whole bag at once (which takes a good half-hour, but it won’t take that much less time for less spinach, so you may as well do the whole bag), steam it in batches, then freeze the batches (making sure to label them with both contents and date) for later use.

Here are the basic steps:

  1. Clean out the sink–both sides if you have a double sink.
  2. Plug up one side of the sink and run a good inch of water into it while you start to add the spinach.
  3. Pull spinach leaves off the steams and add to the water to soak. Discard stems. Make sure to occasionally swish the spinach around in the water and/or spray it with your sprayer.
  4. Once all the leaves are in, move spinach over to the other side of the sink or into a bowl or colander. Rinse out the side that you’ve just used.
  5. Repeat soaking the spinach at least once.
  6. Steam the spinach for about 3-5 minutes (2-3 if you’ve already got the water boiling)–try to get it cooked without the color turning dark. If your steamer or pot isn’t big enough to do all the spinach at once, you can do it in batches.
  7. Use tongs to transfer the spinach into quart size freezer bags (pre-labeled makes life easier, or else use freezer tape to label them). Let the spinach cool before you seal the bags and put them in the freezer.
  8. Voila! You have lots of spinach ready to use when you want.

This method works for any greens (not so much cabbage and lettuce, at least not that I’m aware). I am particularly fond of doing this with collards and freezing them in tiny batches, so that I can hide them in things (none of us likes collards).

Here are some of the things I use the pre-cooked spinach in:

  • Risotto
  • Lasagna
  • Mexican lasagna
  • Quiche
  • Omelets
  • Chili
  • Spinach and potato soup
  • And, our new achievement this year, spinach pasta:

    Spinach pasta

    Ta-da!

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